NO OTHER CHOICE

“When you’re a single mom, you have no other choice but to keep getting out of bed,” Adrienne Gipson said. Not only are these women single moms, but they are single moms fighting breast cancer.

For Adrienne, her terminal diagnosis is coming into reality. When she was diagnosed, the doctors gave her three years. Now, three years later she prepares for her own death by moving in with her sister.

For Abra, the only reason she made it through the first round of treatment was because of her kids. She says “seeing purple,” the color of her two youngest chidren’s school uniforms, helped her get through the worst of radiation treatment.

Singleton Moms, a Scottsdale, Ariz. based organization helps care for these single moms fighting cancer by providing them with groceries, Christmas presents, Easter baskets and much more. Support groups like Singleton Moms help women like Adrienne and Abra understand they aren’t the only ones living through this nightmare.

Staff members at Singleton Moms help carry grocery bags to cars to support single moms with cancer on April 15, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Adrienne Gipson of Phoenix, Ariz. enjoys refreshments with her son King Muhammad, 8, and her neice Charli Gipson, 7, during a Bare Necessities event at Singleton Moms on April 15, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
A photo of Adrienne Gipson, 36, before she received her diagnosis over three years ago on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
“We moved in with my sister so my kids can get used to their new mom,” Adrienne Gipson said of her recent move caused by her stage four terminal breast cancer diagnosis on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Adrienne Gipson’s 36th birthday cake sits uneaten in the kitchen on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Charli Gipson, 7, hugs her favorite book “Green Eggs and Ham” while waiting for someone to read to her on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Charli Gipson, 7, looks for her favorite toy in her room on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
King Muhammad, 8, looks into his patio after climbing over the gate to get a lost ball on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Adrienne Gipson returns inside to nap after helping her son, King Muhammad, 8, hang up his new basketball hoop on April 23, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries

SEEING PURPLE

A photo of Abra White before her diagnosis when she was over 100 pounds heavier. At her smallest, she weighed 90 pounds during chemotheraphy. Photo by Tynin Fries
Abra White, 47, cries as she talks about going through chemotheraphy, radiation and surgeries while fighting breast cancer on April 26, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Abra White, 47, of Cleburne, Texas, lays on her family’s only┬ábed with her children Kaleb, 8, (right) and Malik, 7, on April 26, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Photos on Abra White’s wall on April 26, 2017 that motivate her each morning to continue fighting breast cancer. Photo by Tynin Fries
“In my darkest days I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, but I could see purple,” Abra White, 47, says when describing how her sons’s purple school uniforms inspired her to keep fighting her breast cancer. Photo by Tynin Fries
Malik White, 7, plays on her tablet while waiting for his mom to make dinner on April 26, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
Malik White, 7, plays on his tablet while eating leftover cheeseburgers on April 26, 2017. Photo by Tynin Fries
For Abra, her cancer treatment is over for now. She is still living with cancer but doctors believe the it can be controlled with chemotheraphy prescriptions. Abra White’s sign from her final day of chemotheraphy in December 2016. Photo by Tynin Fries
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